Gorillas, chimps, elephants and zebra

This four-chapter safari was in itself a sequel to a safari that debuted in February 2013. Following a very successful safari through the Serengeti with sightings and experiences ranging from wildebeest calving, herds of elephants walking through the fields of golden grass, prides of lions, cheetah coalitions and an intimate viewing of two leopards as they walked along a gully, I was asked to think about planning another safari.
Serengeti, February 2013
Marc and Barry have travelled extensively and particularly enjoy portrait photography, so we decided on an itinerary that would include the opportunity to photograph mountain gorillas in Rwanda, chimpanzees in Mahale Mountains National Park, elephants in Ruaha, and general wildlife in Ngorongoro Crater. When you are interested in photography, it is important to give it time. Most photos, especially of wildlife, are shot with an exposure that is smaller than one 60th of a second. It is an incredibly short period of time that is influenced by so many variables. It is essential to be patient and in doing so you increase your chance of experiencing and capturing that special fraction of a second.

Follow the links and enjoy some of those moments they captured.

other galleries:

With both of them carrying very nice cameras, I decided to leave my big camera in my bag and opted to use my iPhone. I’ve noticed that phone photography is becoming popular and there are even courses at university level that you can take. The quick editing that some of the apps offer is also quite fun and easy to use.

The images and a video below were all taken with my iPhone and edited on Instagram- each tells a different story.  

This little guy took interest in me and after posing for the photo above began a little performance.

They invite you to play.
Much of the wildlife in Ngorongoro crater is so habituated to vehicles that they hardly move from the road.
Greystoke Camp in Mahale.
Fishing for ants with tools.
You may have seen this pelican on youtube. The new camp pet provides quite the entertainment when you're not trekking the chimps.
Tuskless matriarchs are common in Ruaha.
The wet season in Ruaha can make game viewing a bit difficult but the landscapes are stunning.

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